Tag Archives: Odalis Perez

Soggy Mets

I’ve always been a cynical sports fan. That’s what happens when you root for the Mets and Jets. But I think I sank to a new low last night when, watching David Wright poke a two-run shot in the second inning, my first reaction was “this isn’t going to be enough.” And after the tornado rain delay in the seventh, the Mets went on to prove me right, as Joe Smith and Duaner Sanchez shit a collective brick to give the game away to the struggling D-Backs. By the way, John Maine needs to figure out a way to get his pitch count down. There’s no excuse for having to turn to the bullpen so early when the team’s elite young pitcher is on the mound.

As a Mets fan, last night’s game was hard to watch. But as a baseball fan, there was something very refreshing that happened in the seventh inning. As Pedro Feliciano took the mound, Shea Stadium became the stage for a revival of the Wizard of Oz, with everything and anything swirling around the field. My experience in the last few years with impending weather at ballgames is that umpires will assume nothing until it becomes impossible to play the game. Everyone knew that the heavens were about to open on Flushing. Everyone expected to get wet. But instead of letting this happen, the umpires decided to stop the game right then and there. It turned out to be a great decision, as the grounds crew (with the help of Scott Schoeneweiss and Billy Wagner) got the tarp out there just in time.

MLB’s handling of rain delays has really bugged me this year. Baseball is so inclined not to postpone or cancel games due to so many factors that players are often put in harm’s way as a result. Recently I saw Odalis Perez leave a soaking wet Washington mound injured after it started pouring at a Nationals Cardinals game. The injury, no doubt, was a result of the conditions on the field. It just isn’t worth the risk.

-Jonathan Kraft

Odalis Perez sidelined

Nationals RHP Odalis Perez left the mound early Tuesday night with pain in his left shoulder. According to MLB.com, he has been diagnosed with tendonitis, and will likely miss his next start. This comes as yet another blow to Washington, who already have Ryan Zimmerman, Ronnie Belliard, Nick Johnson, Austin Kearns, Paul Lo Duca, Johnny Estrada, and Chad Cordero on the Disabled List.

Around the Beast

Nationals 5-Brewers 1

Jeff Suppan pitched well for Milwaukee until the sixth, when the [long-absent] Washington offense came alive. After J.J. Hardy mishandled a double-play ball, the Nats broke through, scoring on doubles by Ryan Zimmerman and Jesus Flores and on a Lastings Milledge sacrifice ground ball. Wily Mo Peña his his first home run of the year earlier in the first inning, and Suppan drove in the Brewers’ only run of the game.

Odalis Perez pitched well for the Nationals (5.0 IP, 5 H, 1 ER, 1 BB, 3 SO, 84 P) but left with a no-decision. Brian Sanches, just called up from Triple-A Columbus, struck out the side in the sixth and was credited with the win. Saul Rivera, Luis Ayala, and Jon Rauch closed the door for Washington.

Rockies 5-Mets 4 (F/13)

The Mets dropped their fifth straight game as Matt Holliday hit a walk-off single in the 13th off of Aaron Heilman after homering off of Billy Wagner in the ninth to tie the game (Wagner’s second blown save of the year). It was a back and forth game as neither team dominated on the mound.

Oliver Perez was all over the place for the Mets, going 5 innings allowing 6 hits for 4 earned runs, walking 8 and striking out only 2, and allowing a home run on 110 pitches (just 56 for strikes). Rookie starter Greg Reynolds never dominated for the Rockies, going 6 full innings allowing 4 earned runs on 4 hits, walking 3, striking out 5, and allowing 2 home runs on just 84 pitches thrown. He left the game after allowing back-to-back home runs to Carlos Delgado and Fernando Tatis (who replaced the injured Marlon Anderson) in the 6th.

Driving in runs for the Mets were Luis Castillo, Delgado, Tatis, and Jose Reyes, who got in the home plate umpire’s face after being called out on a very low strike three in the 13th. Garrett Atkins, Clint Barmes, and Holliday drove in runs for the Rockies.

Astros 5-Phillies 4

Brandon Backe was superb for the Astros, giving up just one run in 7.1 innings pitched, striking out 6 and walking one. Adam Eaton didn’t pitch terribly for the Phillies (7.0 IP, 8 H, 3 ER, 1 BB, 2 SO,2 HR, 96 P), but couldn’t keep the ball in the park, giving up two home runs to Hunter Pence.

Also driving in runs for the Astros were former Phillie Michael Bourn (who also stranded three on base), and Carlos Lee (his 36th of the season). For the Phillies, Pat Burrell homered in his second-straight game and Pedro Feliz and Jimmy Rollins also drove runs in.

Diamondbacks 11-Braves 1

Doug Davis returned from cancer surgery in unbelievable fashion, shutting the hot-hitting Braves lineup down for 7 innings, allowing just one earned run on 5 hits, walking 2 and striking out 4 on 89 pitches. His team responded, taking batting practice off of Jo-Jo Reyes (5.0 IP, 6 H, 7 ER, 3 BB, 4 SO, 3 HR) and Chris Resop (2.0 IP, 2 H, 2 ER, 1 BB, 1 SO, 1 HR).

Homering for the D-Backs were Stephen Drew, Eric Byrnes, Conor Jackson, Chris Young, and Mark Reynolds. Whew. Kelly Johnson drove in the only Atlanta run of the night.

Giants 8-Marlins 2

Scott Olsen finally came back down to Earth, surrendering 5 earned runs off of 8 hits in just 3.1 innings pitched, walking 3, striking out 2, and allowing a home run on 81 pitches. Olsen drops to 4-2. He was relieved by Doug Waechter, Renyel Pinto, and Tyler Tankersley, who all pitched much more effectively. Dan Uggla homered for Florida (his 15th of the year) in the ninth, driving in both Marlins runs of the evening.

Barry Zito finally got his first win of the season, giving up just one earned run in 6.1 innings of work, walking 4 and striking out 5. Bengie Molina and Jose Castillo homered for the Giants. Aaron Rowand drove in three runs, and Rich Aurilia drove in two more for San Francisco.

Brett Carroll had to leave the game in the fourth inning after separating his right shoulder. He’ll be placed on the 15-day disabled list.

 

NL Beast goes to Shea

I’ll be at Shea Stadium tonight to see the Mets take on the Washington Nationals [BEAST-OFF] as Odalis Perez battles Nelson Figueroa. I’m pumped…this will be my 5th Mets game of the year, but the first one at Shea (2 in DC, 1 in Philly, 1 in PSL). I tried to go Friday night for my dad’s 50th birthday and got only as far as the Diamond Club (where we saw Keith Hernandez and Tom Seaver) before the game was rained out.

I’ll try and take some good pictures to post soon…lets go Mets!

-Jonathan Kraft

Time for the Mets to shine (or else)

The Mets need to win 5 out of the next 7. The season might depend on it.

That sounds awfully premature in May, right? Here’s my reasoning. The next 7 games are at home against two teams that the Mets should dominate in the Reds and Nationals. Two very beatable teams, at home. After that, this season gets a lot harder: three in the Bronx, four in Atlanta, three in Colorado, then home for three against the [first place] Marlins and three against the Dodgers to close out the month. That’s not an easy stretch.

In the Reds, the Mets take on a team that’s batting .250. The Nationals? .242. The Mets, by the way, are also batting a collective .250, for what it’s worth. Except for Johnny Cueto, who will oppose Oliver Perez on Sunday, the opposing pitchers are not very good (Matt Belisle, Bronson Arroyo, Odalis Perez, John Lannan, Tim Redding, Michael O’Connor.)

If the Mets take 5 of 7, they go into the Bronx with momentum, and probably in first or second place. The booing at Shea will soften, the calls for Willie to be fired will subside. The Mets will reestablish themselves as a top team in the league, after a less than stellar start to the year.

If the Mets don’t dominate these two teams, they limp across the river to play another underachieving club from New York. Shea will not be a pleasant place, and the Fire Willie movement will reach a new high. We’ll understand that this team is underachieving, and this year will start to look a whole lot more ominous.

It’s time for the Mets to step up and prove that they belong in the conversation of the elite teams in the National League. Sure, it’s only May, but this is a turning point.

-Jonathan Kraft

Division Roundup [South of the Mason-Dixon Line Edition]

Almost everyone in the division won tonight (thanks for spoiling the party, Washington).

Braves 5-Padres 2

Tim Hudson had another good start, going 7 full innings allowing 2 runs on 6 hits with 3 walks and 3 strikeouts. He was helped by an all-around offensive effort, including the go-ahead RBI single by newly acquired Greg Norton. Also driving in runs for the Braves were Mark Kotsay, Kelly Johnson, and Yunel Escobar. Manny Acosta shut the door for Atlanta, saving his third of the year.

Marlins 6-Brewers 2

The Marlins keep surprising, well, everyone with their starting pitching. Rookie Burke Badenhop had a strong outing, going 5.2 and surrendering just 2 runs on 5 hits, walking 1 and striking out 7. His team backed the effort well, with Jorge Cantu and Dan Uggla each going yard. Mike Jacobs‘ two-run double in the third started the Marlins rally, but Jacobs soon had to leave the game with tightness in his quad. Milwaukee sluggers Ryan Braun and Prince Fielder combined to go 1-8 on the night.

Astros 4-Nationals 3

The Nationals dropped their second straight in Houston, despite a coming-out party by Ryan Zimmerman. The Z-Man homered twice, in the first and in the sixth, driving in 3 RBIs on the night. Odalis Perez didn’t pitch badly (5.0 IP, 5 H, 3 ER, 2 BB, 3 SO) but he was simply outmatched by Houston ace Roy Oswalt (7.0 IP, 6 H, 3 ER, 2 BB, 9 SO). Outside of the Nationals first three batters, the team combined for one hit on the night (Wily Mo Peña). Paul Lo Duca left the game after re-injuring his right hand (see previous post). Joel Hanrahan took the loss for Washington.

Should the Nats hit the FA Market?

Thomas Boswell thinks so. In today’s Washington Post, Boswell argues that the Nats have to keep up with the rest of the division by signing free agents this offseason, mentioning Orlando Hudson, Rafael Furcal, C.C. Sabathia, and Ben Sheets as possible targets.

Well first of all, scratch Sabathia right off that list, because there’s no way the Nats are getting anywhere close to C.C.

The article brings up a good point (even if Boswell is a bit delusional). The Nationals are at somewhat of a crossroads here. There is talent on this current team, but Jim Bowden’s “dream” lineup of players like Austin Kearns and Felipe Lopez is more of a nightmare at this point. Sure, the Nationals are winning games right now, but if you told NL Beast that it was the starting pitching, not the core offense of Ryan Zimmerman, Nick Johnson, and Lastings Milledge that was most responsible, we’d be shocked.

It’s clear at this point that Stan Kasten‘s philosophy is to wait for the farm system to develop and then compete. There some great players coming up in the future, including Ross Detweiler, Chris Marrero, and Colin Balester, but there is no way this team is going to compete in the near future without signing free agents.

NL Beast is sick of the excuse that the Nationals don’t have the money to compete in the free agent market (Forbes ranked the Nationals as the 13th most profitable team in baseball).

With Felipe Lopez, Cristian Guzman, Wily Mo Peña, and Odalis Perez all becoming free agents after this year, it’s very possible that the starting nine will look very different next year. Or, if history has told us anything, maybe not.