Tag Archives: David Wright

Beast in da House

I’ll be at the House that Mediocrity Built tonight to see the Mets take on Josh Hamilton and the Texas Rangers. I’m expecting a terrible game, as Oliver Perez and his lack of command take on Hamilton, Michael Young, David Murphy, Milton Bradley, and a whole lot of other guys who are hitting the cover off the of the ball, believe it or not. I’ll be the guy in the David Wright pinstripe jersey shaking his head for eight and two-thirds of the gameĀ (gotta beat traffic!) and yelling obscenities at Oliver Perez, Rick Peterson, Willie Randolph, Carlos Delgado, you get the idea.

-Jonathan Kraft

Soggy Mets

I’ve always been a cynical sports fan. That’s what happens when you root for the Mets and Jets. But I think I sank to a new low last night when, watching David Wright poke a two-run shot in the second inning, my first reaction was “this isn’t going to be enough.” And after the tornado rain delay in the seventh, the Mets went on to prove me right, as Joe Smith and Duaner Sanchez shit a collective brick to give the game away to the struggling D-Backs. By the way, John Maine needs to figure out a way to get his pitch count down. There’s no excuse for having to turn to the bullpen so early when the team’s elite young pitcher is on the mound.

As a Mets fan, last night’s game was hard to watch. But as a baseball fan, there was something very refreshing that happened in the seventh inning. As Pedro Feliciano took the mound, Shea Stadium became the stage for a revival of the Wizard of Oz, with everything and anything swirling around the field. My experience in the last few years with impending weather at ballgames is that umpires will assume nothing until it becomes impossible to play the game. Everyone knew that the heavens were about to open on Flushing. Everyone expected to get wet. But instead of letting this happen, the umpires decided to stop the game right then and there. It turned out to be a great decision, as the grounds crew (with the help of Scott Schoeneweiss and Billy Wagner) got the tarp out there just in time.

MLB’s handling of rain delays has really bugged me this year. Baseball is so inclined not to postpone or cancel games due to so many factors that players are often put in harm’s way as a result. Recently I saw Odalis Perez leave a soaking wet Washington mound injured after it started pouring at a Nationals Cardinals game. The injury, no doubt, was a result of the conditions on the field. It just isn’t worth the risk.

-Jonathan Kraft

Happy Days are here again

It’s a different clubhouse when Pedro Martinez is around, and the Mets were buoyed by his presence Tuesday as they defeated the San Francisco Giants 9-6. Pedro went 6 full innings, giving up 3 runs on 7 hits, walking 3 and striking 3 out. The most encouraging stat: he threw 109 pitches. The team rallied around him, with David Wright, Carlos Beltran, Ryan Church, Carlos Delgado, Jose Reyes, Damion Easley, and Martinez all driving in runs.

The Mets certainly can’t count on Pedro for the entire rest of the season; his tenure in New York has proven that. But as long as Pedro is healthy and pitching well, we’ll take it.

-Jonathan Kraft

So is this Mr. Hyde?

This year’s New York Mets have shown flashes of brilliance, but have quickly slid back into mediocrity. The Mets limped home to Shea Stadium last week having gone 2-5 on the week, including a four-game sweep by the Braves at Turner Field. But they came home and made a statement, winning important series against the Marlins and the Dodgers.

Leading the way for the Mets was good starting pitching, including a great performance by Mike Pelfrey and, of course, an awesome outing by Johan Santana. Backing those efforts on the mound were superb weeks by Mets hitters, led by David Wright. David hit .407, .515, .741 with 2 HR and 6 RBI on the week for an OPS of 1.256. Jose Reyes hit .367, .457, .767 with 3 HR and 4 RBI on the week for an OPS of 1.224. Luis Castillo emerged from mediocrity, hitting .348, .464, .652 with 2 HR and 4 RBI for an OPS of 1.116. And Carlos Beltran woke up, hitting .320, .438, .600 with 2 HR and 5 RBI for an OPS of 1.038.

Of course, there are still problems. Carlos Delgado is still not hitting. The starting rotation is still sketchy behind Santana and John Maine. Any reliever not named Billy Wagner, Scott Schoeneweiss, or Joe Smith terrifies me. But Ryan Church has returned to the lineup, as has the swagger of 2006. The question is, will this Mets team continue to play to its potential and win these important games, or will it go lose a series to a terrible San Francisco team and continue its slide from grace? Will Willie Randolph be redeemed by his club’s performance, or will he become a scapegoat yet again? It’s time for the Mets to step it up and prove that this last week was not a fluke, and that the 12th inning victory against the Marlins was a true turning point, not a rare glimpse of what could have been.

-Jonathan Kraft

He’s Baaa-aack

Carlos Beltran has been faulted by just about everyone for his utter lack of production this year (.265, .374, .460, 6 HR, 34 RBI). But Beltran has been on a tear this last week, hitting .308, .406, .462 with 3 RBIs and a home run before tonight. And in his first at-bat tonight, Carlos went yard, driving in David Wright. When Beltran gets hot, he gets hot. It’s been a refreshing change at Shea of late as the Mets’ bats have finally woken up thanks in large part to Beltran.

-Jonathan Kraft

A Character Win

When people speculate what can spark a team’s turn-around, they often look to an extra-innings win as a catalyst. It’s impossible to say that one game can remedy a season of mediocrity, but the New York Mets certainly made a statement Wednesday night, winning in the 12th inning on a Fernando Tatis walk-off double.

On the back of Tatis, an unlikely hero, the Mets take the series from first-place Florida, making a strong statement in the first series of the homestand after a roadtrip to forget. Of course, taking two from the Yankees elicited the same sort of “turn-around” talk from Mets fans.

But what was different last night was the fact that every part of the Mets team contributed to the victory. Oliver Perez wasn’t dominant, but still struck out seven despite giving up four earned runs in six innings. Aaron Heilman looked brilliant in two innings of work, striking out four in two innings. Scott Schoeneweiss and Billy Wagner were phenomenal in an inning each. Endy Chavez forced extras with a pinch-hit home run. Luis Castillo and Jose Reyes also homered. David Wright walked twice. And then there was Tatis, the forgotten star, who is to the Mets right now what Angel Pagan was in Spring Training–invaluable.

Sure, there were faults. The Mets left ten on base, to start. That’s been a problem all year, and it continues. The Mets are a talented team. What they have needed all year is a spark, something to start the engine of a lineup that should be producing a heck of a lot more than it has. Only time will tell, but a win like last night’s, a series win like this one, might be what it takes to jump-start this team.

-Jonathan Kraft

The Mediocre Mets

What a horrible game, what a horrible series, what a mediocre season. Sure, theĀ Mets had some “momentum” coming out of the Bronx, but, at the end of the day, they beat a Yankee team mired in even more mediocrity. Take that series away, and you find a Mets team that, in the last week, has dropped three of four to Washington and at least three of four in Atlanta. Now the Braves are playing good baseball, but there is no reason why the Mets should have scored only seven runs in the past three games against Atlanta.

The Mets are a team whose offense is often stagnant if Jose Reyes doesn’t hit, a team whose pitching is atrocious if Johan Santana isn’t on the mound and a team with no heart. They take the field every night making baseball look like a job. Once a week, maybe, you’ll see the joyful atmosphere of two years ago, with the Mets scoring 12 runs and Reyes running around dancing with everyone in the dugout. The rest of the time, either David Wright is “embarrassed” of the team’s performance, Billy Wagner is calling someone out for blowing the game, or Willie Randolph is making excuses for why his job should not be on the line.

Something has got to give here. This team has far too much talent to continue to under perform to the degree that it has. I’m not jumping on the Fire Willie bandwagon…yet, but I’m not far away. If this team loses today and loses the series against lowly Colorado, that all might change quickly.

Ladies and gentlemen, your 2008 Mediocre Mets.

-Jonathan Kraft